Step guide template

Key takeaways

  • Many forms of contraception are available to prevent unwanted pregnancy, including condoms, IUDs, hormonal contraceptives, and progestin-only contraceptives.
  • To prevent STIs, use barrier forms of protection such as condoms, dental dams, and gloves, stay up to date with vaccines, and get tested regularly.
  • Certain groups within the LGBTQIA+ community are more at risk of contracting HIV. Still, there are effective ways to reduce transmission, including taking pre-exposure prophylaxis and using condoms during every sexual activity.

Effective pregnancy prevention options

If you have a uterus and ovaries, you can likely become pregnant if you have sex with a partner who produces sperm, regardless of your gender. If you have a uterus and ovaries and are taking testosterone, you may still be able to become pregnant, even if you are no longer menstruating. Similarly, if your partner has a penis and is taking estrogen, they may still be able to get you pregnant. If you’re not looking to get pregnant, there are many forms of contraception to choose from.

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Krupa Playforth, M.D.

Condoms

Condoms are a common form of birth control, as they help to prevent pregnancy and STIs. However, condoms aren’t the most effective form of contraception. When used correctly, the failure rate for condoms is around 3%. However, for the way people typically use them, the failure rate is approximately 12%. Condoms are best used as an additional form of contraception to help prevent STIs.

IUDs

Intrauterine devices (IUDs) are highly effective long-acting reversible contraceptives that are placed inside the uterus. There are two types of IUDs: the copper IUD, which is 99.2% effective in preventing pregnancy, and the hormonal IUD, which uses a small amount of progesterone and is 99.3% effective in preventing pregnancy. Both IUD types are safe for trans and nonbinary individuals undergoing gender-affirming hormone therapy. However, while the hormonal IUD often reduces or stops menstrual bleeding, the copper IUD does not have this effect on many individuals.

  • Both IUD types are safe for trans and nonbinary individuals
  • Both IUD types are safe for trans and nonbinary individuals
  • Both IUD types are safe for trans and nonbinary individuals

Combined hormonal contraceptives

Combined hormonal contraceptives, such as the pill, the patch, and the vaginal ring, all contain the hormones estrogen and progestin. These types of contraception are good at reducing heavy periods, painful periods, and acne. They are very effective at preventing pregnancy, with the pill, patch, and ring resulting in 7 pregnancies per 100 uterus owners per year. If you’re taking testosterone as gender-affirming hormone therapy, you may want to avoid combined hormonal contraceptives, as it is unknown if the estrogen can interfere with testosterone.

  1. Both IUD types are safe for trans and nonbinary individuals
  2. Both IUD types are safe for trans and nonbinary individuals
  3. Both IUD types are safe for trans and nonbinary individuals
ProductSkinXmed
EffectAnti aging
Possible RisksNot known
ContentContents 30 ml or 50 ml
EffectAnti aging

Key takeaways

  • Many forms of contraception are available to prevent unwanted pregnancy, including condoms, IUDs, hormonal contraceptives, and progestin-only contraceptives.
  • To prevent STIs, use barrier forms of protection such as condoms, dental dams, and gloves, stay up to date with vaccines, and get tested regularly.
  • Certain groups within the LGBTQIA+ community are more at risk of contracting HIV. Still, there are effective ways to reduce transmission, including taking pre-exposure prophylaxis and using condoms during every sexual activity.

Effective pregnancy prevention options

If you have a uterus and ovaries, you can likely become pregnant if you have sex with a partner who produces sperm, regardless of your gender. If you have a uterus and ovaries and are taking testosterone, you may still be able to become pregnant, even if you are no longer menstruating. Similarly, if your partner has a penis and is taking estrogen, they may still be able to get you pregnant. If you’re not looking to get pregnant, there are many forms of contraception to choose from.

Condoms

Condoms are a common form of birth control, as they help to prevent pregnancy and STIs. However, condoms aren’t the most effective form of contraception. When used correctly, the failure rate for condoms is around 3%. However, for the way people typically use them, the failure rate is approximately 12%. Condoms are best used as an additional form of contraception to help prevent STIs.

IUDs

Intrauterine devices (IUDs) are highly effective long-acting reversible contraceptives that are placed inside the uterus. There are two types of IUDs: the copper IUD, which is 99.2% effective in preventing pregnancy, and the hormonal IUD, which uses a small amount of progesterone and is 99.3% effective in preventing pregnancy. Both IUD types are safe for trans and nonbinary individuals undergoing gender-affirming hormone therapy. However, while the hormonal IUD often reduces or stops menstrual bleeding, the copper IUD does not have this effect on many individuals.

  • Both IUD types are safe for trans and nonbinary individuals
  • Both IUD types are safe for trans and nonbinary individuals
  • Both IUD types are safe for trans and nonbinary individuals

Combined hormonal contraceptives

Combined hormonal contraceptives, such as the pill, the patch, and the vaginal ring, all contain the hormones estrogen and progestin. These types of contraception are good at reducing heavy periods, painful periods, and acne. They are very effective at preventing pregnancy, with the pill, patch, and ring resulting in 7 pregnancies per 100 uterus owners per year. If you’re taking testosterone as gender-affirming hormone therapy, you may want to avoid combined hormonal contraceptives, as it is unknown if the estrogen can interfere with testosterone.

  1. Both IUD types are safe for trans and nonbinary individuals
  2. Both IUD types are safe for trans and nonbinary individuals
  3. Both IUD types are safe for trans and nonbinary individuals

Effective pregnancy prevention options

If you have a uterus and ovaries, you can likely become pregnant if you have sex with a partner who produces sperm, regardless of your gender. If you have a uterus and ovaries and are taking testosterone, you may still be able to become pregnant, even if you are no longer menstruating. Similarly, if your partner has a penis and is taking estrogen, they may still be able to get you pregnant. If you’re not looking to get pregnant, there are many forms of contraception to choose from.

Condoms

Condoms are a common form of birth control, as they help to prevent pregnancy and STIs. However, condoms aren’t the most effective form of contraception. When used correctly, the failure rate for condoms is around 3%. However, for the way people typically use them, the failure rate is approximately 12%. Condoms are best used as an additional form of contraception to help prevent STIs.

IUDs

Intrauterine devices (IUDs) are highly effective long-acting reversible contraceptives that are placed inside the uterus. There are two types of IUDs: the copper IUD, which is 99.2% effective in preventing pregnancy, and the hormonal IUD, which uses a small amount of progesterone and is 99.3% effective in preventing pregnancy. Both IUD types are safe for trans and nonbinary individuals undergoing gender-affirming hormone therapy. However, while the hormonal IUD often reduces or stops menstrual bleeding, the copper IUD does not have this effect on many individuals.

  • Both IUD types are safe for trans and nonbinary individuals
  • Both IUD types are safe for trans and nonbinary individuals
  • Both IUD types are safe for trans and nonbinary individuals

Combined hormonal contraceptives

Combined hormonal contraceptives, such as the pill, the patch, and the vaginal ring, all contain the hormones estrogen and progestin. These types of contraception are good at reducing heavy periods, painful periods, and acne. They are very effective at preventing pregnancy, with the pill, patch, and ring resulting in 7 pregnancies per 100 uterus owners per year. If you’re taking testosterone as gender-affirming hormone therapy, you may want to avoid combined hormonal contraceptives, as it is unknown if the estrogen can interfere with testosterone.

  1. Both IUD types are safe for trans and nonbinary individuals
  2. Both IUD types are safe for trans and nonbinary individuals
  3. Both IUD types are safe for trans and nonbinary individuals

Frequently Asked Questions

What should I eat when I have diarrhea?

Eat simple items such plain rice, boiled potatoes, toast, bananas, and boiling chicken.

What should I drink to stay hydrated if I have diarrhea?

Eat simple items such plain rice, boiled potatoes, toast, bananas, and boiling chicken.

What foods should I avoid when I have diarrhea?

Eat simple items such plain rice, boiled potatoes, toast, bananas, and boiling chicken.

Can I drink alcohol if I have diarrhea?

Eat simple items such plain rice, boiled potatoes, toast, bananas, and boiling chicken.

How long should I follow a diarrhea-friendly diet?

Eat simple items such plain rice, boiled potatoes, toast, bananas, and boiling chicken.

Can I eat dairy products if I have diarrhea?

Eat simple items such plain rice, boiled potatoes, toast, bananas, and boiling chicken.

Can I drink tea or coffee when I have diarrhea?

Eat simple items such plain rice, boiled potatoes, toast, bananas, and boiling chicken.

Is it safe to eat fruits or vegetables if I have diarrhea?

Eat simple items such plain rice, boiled potatoes, toast, bananas, and boiling chicken.

What should I eat when I have diarrhea?

Eat simple items such plain rice, boiled potatoes, toast, bananas, and boiling chicken.

What should I eat when I have diarrhea?

Eat simple items such plain rice, boiled potatoes, toast, bananas, and boiling chicken.